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Protection

Forest Tent Caterpillar

What are they?

Currently, populations of forest tent caterpillar are found to be increasing in many parts of the City of Ottawa. Forest tent caterpillars are native insects that can periodically reach high population levels and feed on the leaves of several tree species. As a caterpillar, this insect will feed on leaves of tree species such as poplar, birch, maple, and oak. Caterpillar feeding occurs during the months of May and June. In July, the insect will become a moth and lay eggs which overwinter for the following season.

Forest Tent Caterpillar

Forest tent caterpillars have a similar life cycle to other tent caterpillars, with one distinct difference: instead of building tent-like webs, they make a type of silken mat on the trunk or branches where they collect to rest, leaving only to feed on the leaves. These caterpillars are black, and have a series of white spots on their back. The adult moth is a yellow-brown colour.

What is the City doing about it?

We have communicated with the Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry, and they report to be monitoring the issue with increased populations of this insect in other areas of the province, including around Kemptville. City staff continue to monitor this issue.

What might residents notice?

Residents may see large groups of caterpillars on tree trunks and branches and some loss of leaves (defoliation) on trees this spring as a result of this insect. Healthy trees are able to sustain loss of leaves and some trees will produce a second flush of leaves in the same season following leaf loss. It is only repeated years of caterpillar feeding that cause concern with tree health.

Should residents be concerned?

On their properties, residents can consider the following to reduce damage to trees and reduce caterpillar numbers:

Caterpillars can be physically removed with a broom or knocked down with a stream of water from a garden hose.

Burlap can be attached to the trunk of trees just below the lowest branches. The burlap can be attached with a string in a band around the trunk and folded in half. Often caterpillars will congregate in the burlap and this can be disposed of daily in compost etc.

More details about this insect can be found at https://www.ontario.ca/page/forest-tent-caterpillar

How to get a distinctive tree permit*NEW CHANGES

If you are interested in removing a distinctive tree from your property, you must first determine if the tree is 50 cm in diameter or greater and then follow the steps below. For help on how to determine the diameter of your tree, please see How to Measure a Tree. Note that as of May 24, 2016, all Distinctive Tree Permit applications will cost $100 and must be applied for in person at a client service centre. This change was implemented as part of the 2016 Council approved budget to cover administration costs.

  1. Confirm ownership of the tree. If the trunk of the tree (not including root flare) is straddling other properties, agreement of tree removal is required by all property owners.
  2. Hire an arborist to prepare an Arborist Report using the Arborist Report Template. The arborist can apply for a permit on your behalf if you provide them with written consent to do so.
  3. Visit a client service centre except for the Walter Baker Sports Centre, to apply in person. Fill out the Application Form, and submit along with the Arborist Report (from template) and $100 in payment. Note that you will no longer be able to apply for a Distinctive Tree Permit via 311 or by fax. An Arborist Report is NOT required if you are also applying for a Building Permit at the same address for a new single, semi, duplex or triplex within the greenbelt on or after May 24, 2016. This information will be included in the Tree Disclosure Information. As a result of the Infill and Trees Conservation Program, the Tree Disclosure Information is a new requirement of the building permit submission. The greenbelt area is defined as anything in wards 7 to 18.
  4. Your application will be received and a request for service will be sent out to a Forestry Inspector.
  5. The Forestry Inspector will conduct a site visit and issue a permit provided the Arborist Report is accepted. Please note our standard initial response time for Distinctive Tree Permit Requests is 15 days.
  6. If a permit is granted, it must be posted in a prominent location that is visible to the public for seven days in advance of the tree cutting and seven days following its removal.
  7. Note that there is no refund if the permit is not issued, as the $100 fee is an application fee.
 The Arborist Report

Are you an Arborist?

Effective May 24, 2016, you must use the Arborist Report Template in order to ensure that all the relevant information is captured. The Arborist Report gives specific information about the tree for which a permit is being requested. The report is required in order to obtain a distinctive tree permit because it helps determine the legitimacy of tree permit requests. It is a third-party review of the tree’s condition. The key element of the report describes the condition of the tree which could include information on the health, condition, structural integrity and vigour of the tree.


The report will be prepared by an expert in the care and maintenance of trees. This could include an arborist qualified by the Ontario Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities, a certified arborist with the International Society of Arboriculture, a consulting arborist registered with the American Society of Consulting Arborists, a Registered Professional Forester, or a person with similar qualifications.

The following information must be included in the Arborist Report

  • Tree species
  • Diameter of the tree (to be measured at breast height, which is 1.2 metres from the ground)
  • General location of the tree on the property
  • A short statement on the condition of the tree
  • Arborist’s recommendation for the tree
  • The reason for tree removal
  • The property owner's name and address
  • The address of where the tree is located (if it is different from above)
  • The author's name, address, phone number, signature, and professional designation (where applicable)

Information for arborists

Note that hazardous trees are exempt from the by-law, under Section 25 (f) that states "A distinctive tree permit is not required in the following circumstances where the tree is an immediate threat to public health and safety". The City of Ottawa considers an ash tree that is heavily infested with the emerald ash borer an immediate threat to public health and safety and can be removed without a permit. It is recommended that the arborist take photos for their records of an exempted tree they are removing to provide evidence that the tree is a hazard.

With written consent from a resident (signature on the Arborist Report Template, the Arborist can apply for a Distinctive Tree Permit on their behalf. In order to apply for a Distinctive Tree Permit, the Arborist will need to prepare an Arborist report for each tree that is to be removed. 

 The Arborist Report must be prepared using the Arborist Report Template to ensure that all of the following information is captured:

  • Tree species
  • Diameter of the tree (to be measured at breast height, which is 1.2 metres from the ground)
  • General location of the tree on the property
  • A short statement on the condition of the tree
  • Arborist’s recommendation for the tree
  • The reason for tree removal
  • The property owner's name and address
  • The address of where the tree is located (if it is different from above)
  • The author's name, address, phone number, signature, and professional designation (where applicable)

Please note that the City reserves the right to reject the Arborist Report based on missing relevant information. In the event that a permit is not issued, the $100 permit fee is not refunded. Once the Arborist Report is prepared, the Arborist may apply on behalf of the client in person at one of the Client Service Centres, except for the Walter Baker Sports Centre. Please visit How to Apply for a Distinctive Tree Permit for more information on what is required.

The Urban Tree Conservation By-law was implemented, in part, to ensure the protection of Distinctive trees in the urban area of Ottawa. The Arborist report is meant to be an independent third party verification that the tree needs to be removed. In order to promote a healthy forest canopy in our city, it is the Aborist’s responsibility to ensure that tree removal is the only option and that all other avenues for keeping and maintaining the tree have been explored. Please note that the City reserves the right to reject an application to remove a Distinctive tree if there is not a valid reason for removal.

Note that all emerald ash borer removals must be disposed of within the Canadian Food Inspection Agency’s Regulated Areas.

How to measure the diameter of a tree

Measuring a tree with a metre stick

When measuring the diameter of a tree, the measurement must be taken at a height of 1.2 metres (four feet) above ground level. Two methods are outlined below to help guide you in measuring the diameter of a tree:
 

  1. For a quick estimate, hold a metre stick up to the tree at 1.2 metres (four feet) above ground level. One end of the metre stick should be placed approximately at the edge of the tree trunk. Hold the stick steady and read the number at the other edge of the tree trunk to approximate the diameter of the tree.
  2. It is more precise to use a measuring tape around the trunk of the tree, at a height of 1.2 metres (four feet) above ground level, to determine the circumference of the tree (i.e., the distance around the trunk). To convert the circumference you have measured to diameter, to divide the circumference in centimetres by pi (3.1416). This will give you the diameter of the tree.

For properties greater than 1 hectare in size, a City-approved Tree Conservation Report is required for the removal of any tree measuring 10 centimetres (4 inches) in diameter or more, A tree with a diameter of 10 centimetres will have a circumference of 31.4 centimetres (12 inches).
For properties one hectare or less in size, a permit is required for the removal of a distinctive tree, defined as a tree with a diameter of 50 centimetres (20 inches) or more. A tree with a diameter of 50 centimetres (20 inches) has a circumference of 157 centimetres (62 inches).
 

Special circumstances

For a multi-stemmed tree, the diameters of all the stems are to be measured at 1.2 metres (four feet) from the ground. If any of the stems measure 50 centimetres (20 inches) in diameter or greater, it is considered to be a distinctive tree. Therefore, the by-law applies and a permit is required for removal. Other stems that are less than 50 centimetres in diameter can be removed without a permit as long as their removal does not affect the integrity of the distinctive tree.

Measuring a tree with a measuring tape

Trees on a slope should be measured at 1.2 metres (four feet) from the ground at the centre of the trunk axis (on the side of the slope) so the height of measurement is the average of the shortest and longest sides of the trunk.

Trees with a leaning trunk should be measured at 1.2 metres (four feet) from the ground along the centre of the trunk axis (along the angle of the trunk) so the height of measurement is the height along the trunk.

A forked tree should be measured at the narrowest part of the main stem below the fork. If the base of the fork is too high to reach, the tree should be measured at 1.2 metres. The height of this measurement and the height of the fork should also be recorded (for example: 75 centimetres diameter at 0.8. metres, fork at 1.1 metres).

Information for arborists

Note that hazardous trees are exempt from the by-law, under Section 25 (f) that states "A distinctive tree permit is not required in the following circumstances where the tree is an immediate threat to public health and safety". The City of Ottawa considers an ash tree that is heavily infested with the emerald ash borer an immediate threat to public health and safety and can be removed without a permit. It is recommended that the arborist take photos for their records of an exempted tree they are removing to provide evidence that the tree is a hazard.

With written consent from a resident (signature on the Arborist Report Template), the Arborist can apply for a Distinctive Tree Permit on their behalf. In order to apply for a Distinctive Tree Permit, the Arborist will need to prepare an Arborist report for each tree that is to be removed.

The Arborist Report must be prepared using the Arborist Report Template to ensure that all of the following information is captured:

  • Tree species
  • Diameter of the tree (to be measured at breast height, which is 1.2 metres from the ground)
  • General location of the tree on the property
  • A short statement on the condition of the tree
  • Arborist’s recommendation for the tree
  • The reason for tree removal
  • The property owner's name and address
  • The address of where the tree is located (if it is different from above)
  • The author's name, address, phone number, signature, and professional designation (where applicable)


Please note that the City reserves the right to reject the Arborist Report based on missing relevant information. In the event that a permit is not issued, the $100 permit fee is not refunded. Once the Arborist Report is prepared, the Arborist may apply on behalf of the client in person at one of the Client Service Centres, except for the Walter Baker Sports Centre.. Please visit How to Apply for a Distinctive Tree Permit for more information on what is required.

The Urban Tree Conservation By-law was implemented, in part, to ensure the protection of Distinctive trees in the urban area of Ottawa. The Arborist report is meant to be an independent third party verification that the tree needs to be removed. In order to promote a healthy forest canopy in our city, it is the Aborist’s responsibility to ensure that tree removal is the only option and that all other avenues for keeping and maintaining the tree have been explored. Please note that the City reserves the right to reject an application to remove a Distinctive tree if there is not a valid reason for removal.
Note that all emerald ash borer removals must be disposed of within the Canadian Food Inspection Agency’s Regulated Areas.

Protecting trees

The purpose of The City of Ottawa’s Trees and Natural Areas Protection By-law is to protect and maintain trees on City property. The intent of the by-law is to protect trees when there is construction happening around them. The other by-law that also regulates work around city trees is the Road Activity By-law. Both by-laws identify guidelines to follow when working around trees since trees can be seriously damaged if the roots are compacted or cut or damaged by digging caused by heavy equipment.
Contractors 

Information for contractors when working around trees

Soil compaction and vibrations from construction equipment can cause root damage. The Trees and Natural Areas Protection By-law requires that contractors working near trees must:

  • erect a fence at the critical root zone (CRZ) of trees
  • not place any material or equipment within the CRZ of the tree
  • not attach any signs, notices or posters to any tree
  • not raise or lower the existing grade within the CRZ of a tree without approval of Forestry Services
  • tunnel or bore when digging within the CRZ of any tree
  • not damage the root system, trunk or branches of any tree
  • ensure that exhaust fumes from all equipment are not directed towards any tree's canopy

Contractors must:

  • be familiar with the Trees by- law and the Road Cut By-law prior to commencing any work
  • obtain all permits and approvals prior to the start of construction
  • call a City Tree inspector when work is required near City trees

Critical root zone (CRZ) of a tree

D = diameter of trunk in centimetres
D x 10cm = Critical Root Zone

The critical root zone is established as being 10 centimetres from the trunk of a tree for every centimetre of trunk diameter. The trunk diameter is measured at a height of 1.2 metres for trees of 15 centimetres diameter and greater and at a height of 0.3 metres for trees of less than 15 centimetres diameter.

Contractors must:

• be familiar with the Trees and Natural Areas Protection By-law and the Road Activity by-law prior to commencing any work around trees

• contact 3-1-1 to request a site visit by a Forestry Inspector prior to applying for a building permit or to the committee of adjustment or if you are a utility company requesting to work near a city tree(s)

If trees are damaged and requires removal: 

The contractor must obtain approval from Forestry Services before removing any tree on City property. If a tree is damaged or removed, the contractor will be required to:

• pay the cost of repairs and labour, or pay for the removal of the tree
• pay the value of the tree removed
• pay the cost of a replacement tree and its installation 

Utilities

• The Trees and Natural Areas Protection by- law applies to all contractors working for a public or private utility.

Trees and Natural Areas Protection By-law (By-law No. 2006-279) 
Road Activity By-law (By-law NO. 2003 – 445).


For more information on the City of Ottawa's  tree protection guidelines, please call 3-1-1.

Protection

Urban tree conservation by-law

The Urban Tree Conservation By-law applies to private land within the urban area of the City of Ottawa plus specific adjacent rural areas recommended by staff for inclusion within the urban boundary, including a small area in the east end along the Ottawa River, between the urban boundary and Ted Kelly Lane. These areas are shown on Schedules C through H of the by-law.

The by-law currently doesn't apply to any other property in the rural area, nor does it apply to normal farming practices, orchards, tree farms, golf courses, or cemeteries anywhere in the city.

There are two main sections in the by-law:

  1. Large Property Component -- For properties greater than one hectare in size, except condominium and multi-residential properties, landowners must have a City-approved Tree Conservation Report before trees over 10 centimetres in diameter can be cut down.
  2. Small Property Component -- For properties one hectare or less in size, and condominium and multi-residential properties of all sizes, if a landowner wants to remove a tree that is greater than 50 centimetres (20 inches) in diameter, they must obtain a Distinctive Tree Permit from the City.

Learn more about the City’s tree conservation report guidelines and urban tree conservation.

For more information: urbantree@ottawa.ca, or call 3-1-1 (TTY: 613-580-2401).

Measuring your tree

Find out how to measure the diameter of a tree.

Tree permit costs

For properties greater than one hectare, if the tree removal is a part of a development application, the tree permit fee is included in the development application fee. For properties one hectare or less, the application fee is $100.

Find out what you need to do in order to remove a distinctive tree.

Offences under the by-law

Under the by-law, an offence may include destruction of a tree or injuring a tree without a permit, failing to protect a tree that is identified for protection in the permit conditions, or failing to comply with a stop work order.

Penalties

If convicted of an offence, the penalties range from a minimum fine of $500 to a maximum fine of $100,000. For failing to adhere to a stop work order, the minimum fine is $500 and the maximum fine is $100,000 for each day or part of a day that the offence continues; in this case the total of all daily fines is not limited to $100,000.

City of Ottawa Infill Tree Conservation Program

Tree conservation is considered an essential element in the growth and development of the city of Ottawa. Trees improve air quality, reduce heating and cooling costs, minimize our carbon footprint, and increase property value. The Infill Tree Conservation Program has been developed to maintain and enhance these benefits within the city.

These infill guidelines apply to all new single, semi-detached, duplex and triplex units built inside the greenbelt that are not subject to Site Plan or Subdivision applications.

Please visit the City of Ottawa Infill Tree Conservation Program for more information.

Tree Conservation Report Guidelines

The importance of protecting vegetation cover on sites subject to development is outlined in the Official Plan (Section 4.7.2). Together, the Tree Conservation Report and the Landscape Plan ensure that trees will be retained in development scenarios, where feasible, and that new trees will be planted to contribute to the City’s forest cover target and to address a site’s tree loss.

The purpose of the Tree Conservation Report is to retain as much natural vegetation as possible, including mature trees, stands of trees, and hedgerows, using a design with nature approach to planning and engineering. A design with nature approach incorporates the natural features of a site into the design and engineering of a proposed development. This includes, but is not limited to, measures such as retention of vegetation, consideration of wildlife habitats, and respect for natural drainage patterns.

The report should consider natural features not just on the study site, but on the surrounding landscape as well. This will provide context for the site and show natural area representation at a larger scale surrounding the given site.

The report will identify and describe the vegetative cover on the site prior to development. It will provide a professional opinion as to the priority that should be given to the conservation of the treed areas on site. And it will show how the priority features have been incorporated into the proposed development.

Process

  • The Tree Conservation Report is required for all Plans of Subdivision, Site Plan Control Applications, Common Elements Condominium Applications, and Vacant Land Condominium Applications where there is a tree of 10 centimetres in diameter or greater on the site.
  • A Tree Conservation Report is also required for the removal of trees over 10 cm in diameter on properties over 1 ha in the urban area of Ottawa when there is no development application associated with the proposed removal. For these Reports there is a $100 processing fee that can be made payable to the City of Ottawa. They can be sent directly to the Forester in the Planning Department at the following address:
    Forester – Planning and Growth Management Department
    110 Laurier Avenue West, Ottawa, ON
    K1P 1J1
  • The report will be prepared by an individual with proven expertise and/or professional qualifications in forestry, ecology, biology, arboriculture, or landscape architecture in accordance with the definition of “arborist” in Section 1 of By-law No. 2009-200.
  • The qualifications of the person preparing the report will be indicated in the document.
  • The Tree Conservation Report will be submitted for approval with a development application, before an application, or at the time of the pre-consultation. The approval of the report constitutes the permit to remove trees. It will be submitted and approved before any site alteration activities occur on site, including soil testing and other investigative site works.
  • The report will be submitted in hard copy and digital format.
  • The removal of trees on the site cannot occur until written approval of the Tree Conservation Report has been granted (as per By-law No. 2009-200).
  • Amendments to the report may be submitted for approval if changes are required as a result of investigative site works, infrastructure and engineering approvals, or other plan changes. Tree removal, and any activities that could injure trees, must not occur until the amendment has been approved.
  • A copy of the report must be available on-site during tree removal, grading, construction, and any other site alteration activities.
  • Adherence to the directions outlined in the Tree Conservation Report will be monitored on-site by City staff during construction.
  • The Landscape Plan will follow the recommendations made and approved in this report.
  • Elements outlined in the Tree Conservation Report will be incorporated into conditions of draft plan approval where relevant.
  • If an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is required for a given site, that report will take the place of the Tree Conservation Report. The EIS will contain the elements listed below in addition to the EIS requirements. Tree removal, and any activities that could injure trees, must not occur until written approval of the EIS is provided.

Elements

The Tree Conservation Report will include the following elements:

  1. An inventory of the trees currently on site, including species composition, size, age, and condition and health of the trees.
  2. A description of the environmental value of the trees within the site and their ecological function, including their context within the surrounding landscape. The following natural elements should be considered:
    1. Surface water features, including wetlands and watercourses;
    2. Steep slopes, including valleys and escarpments;
    3. Valued woodlots designated as Urban Natural Features or Natural Environment Areas, areas evaluated in the Urban Natural Areas Environmental Evaluation Study (UNAEES), or other areas that meet the criteria used in the UNAEES;
    4. In the rural area, identify the presence of significant woodlands, which are woodlands that contain mature stands of trees 80 years or older, have interior forest habitat more than 100 metres from forest edge, and are adjacent to a surface water feature;
    5. Greenspace linkages as identified in the Greenspace Master Plan or as may occur in the larger landscape;
    6. High quality, specimen trees;
    7. The presence of rare communities or other unique ecological features, as may be identified in available data sources including the Natural Environment System Strategy, Natural Heritage Information Centre, Ecological Land Classification, or other MNR data;
    8. Species at Risk and their habitat.
  3. Map # 1 Current Vegetation - A current aerial photograph of the site (available through the City’s e-map tool) showing the current vegetation mapped as an overlay. This map should be at the same scale as the draft plan of subdivision or site plan. The following elements must be included:
    1. The property line;
    2. The vegetation communities;
    3. Single trees and small clumps of trees;
    4. Existing buildings and impervious surfaces (e.g. driveways and parking lots);
    5. Surface water features;
    6. Steep slopes;
    7. Locations of wetlands, valued woodlots, high quality trees, rare communities, and species at risk, including their habitat;
    8. Greenspace linkages (for larger scale linkages, this can also be shown on a separate map);
    9. Names of surrounding roads;
    10. Standard mapping elements such as a north arrow, scale, date, and legend.
  4. Map # 2 Proposed Development and Conserved Vegetation – The same aerial photograph of the site as in Map # 1 showing the proposed development or the proposed plan of undertaking as an overlay. This should be at the same scale as the draft plan of subdivision or site plan. The following elements must be included:
    1. Proposed development (including; roads, infrastructure, stormwater management, lot lines, etc.) or the proposed plan of undertaking;
    2. The property line;
    3. Existing buildings and impervious surfaces (e.g. driveways and parking lots);
    4. Treed areas identified for protection;
    5. Surface water features;
    6. Steep slopes;
    7. Locations of wetlands, valued woodlots, high quality trees, rare communities, and Species at Risk;
    8. Remaining greenspace linkages (for larger scale linkages, this can also be shown on a separate map);
    9. Names of surrounding roads;
    10. Standard mapping elements such as a north arrow, scale, date, and legend.
  5. Identify what vegetation will be retained and why it has been chosen for retention. If there are several vegetated areas on site or a large area, it should be identified how the areas are prioritized for retention.
  6. An indication of how parkland dedication, road locations, infrastructure, stormwater management facilities, creative lot layouts, and design approaches can help to conserve vegetated areas, where feasible.
  7. Describe the area and nature of vegetation loss on the site and how it will affect the natural systems on site and on the surrounding landscape. Refer to the features outlined in #2 a-h.
  8. The impact of the development on the conserved portions of vegetation should be examined and outlined, including and not limited to the impacts of grade change, changes to drainage patterns, effects of impervious surfaces and new buildings, and changes in the water table.
  9. Describe mitigation measures that will be used to promote the long-term survival of retained trees and woodlands (e.g. buffers for protection, fencing, single loaded roads along forest stands, edge preparation).
  10. Outline the protection measures during construction for trees and woodlands being retained that may be impacted by the construction. Where feasible, show that efforts will be made to protect trees on adjacent property that may be impacted by the construction. Use the following protection measures for retained trees:
  • Erect a fence at the critical root zone (CRZ) of trees;
  • Do not place any material or equipment within the CRZ of the tree;
  • Do not attach any signs, notices or posters to any tree;
  • Do not raise or lower the existing grade within the CRZ without approval;
  • Tunnel or bore when digging within the CRZ of a tree;
  • Do not damage the root system, trunk or branches of any tree;
  • Ensure that exhaust fumes from all equipment are NOT directed towards any tree's canopy.
  1. Where there is substantial alteration of the tree cover on the site, consider the impact on fauna or rare species during and after construction and propose mitigation measures. Indicate how this is meeting any existing legislation on species protection.
  2. Include tree planting recommendations for the site which will direct the development of the Landscape Plan, including the following recommendations:
    1. The species to be used for the given site conditions;
    2. The use of native, non-invasive tree species. In applicable areas, the Guidelines for Planting in Areas of Sensitive Marine Clay must be followed;
    3. Where tree planting is required to provide protection for watercourses and steep slopes;
    4. How the proposed tree planting will help offset the vegetation loss on site;
    5. How the tree planting recommendations implement existing plans and policies for the site, including a Community Design Plan, Neighbourhood Plan, Heritage Streetscape, Design Guidelines, and Landscape Guidelines.

Information to be included with Tree Conservation Report

  1. The name, address and telephone number of the owner.
  2. The name, address and telephone number of the applicant, if different from the owner, and the owner’s written consent to the application.
  3. The name, address and telephone number of the professional hired by the owner or applicant to complete the report.
  4. The name, address and telephone number of the contractor implementing the tree and forest conservation plan, if applicable.
  5. The municipal address and legal description of the land, upon which the trees are proposed to be protected, injured or destroyed.
  6. Confirmation of existing Official Plan and zoning designations, and the status of any planning applications on the property.
  7. The purpose for which the Tree Conservation Report is being prepared.
  8. A schedule of the proposed works, including the start and end dates and the construction period.
  9. Confirmation of any other applications affecting the land, upon which the trees are to be protected, injured or destroyed.

Tree inventory

Tree inventories are an essential tool to protect and enhance urban and rural forests which helps ensure healthy forests for generations to come. They are useful to help maintain diversity in the street tree population, assess the health of the urban forest, and communicate with property owners. Inventories need to be updated regularly in order to help schedule tree maintenance work, determine planting sites, and manage invasive insects. The inventory of city-owned trees began in March 2009 and once completed it will contain information on over 300,000 street and park trees, woodlots, ravines, and community forests.

Data collection

Data collection is performed by City Forestry Inspectors using Trimble’s GeoXT Handheld units. Information such as species, diameter, health condition and GPS location is gathered on individual street trees and downloaded into a database where the records can be extracted and mapped to provide information on the number of different types of trees on a particular street.

Report a city tree in poor health

You may create a service request to report a tree on municipal property that you suspect is in poor health.

A forestry inspector will visit the site within 15 business days to examine the condition of the tree and determine the work to be done.  The Forestry Inspector will leave you a voice message or door knocker with the status of your call.

Report a city tree you suspect is in poor health